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The following 3 experts are listed against your chosen search criteria of:
Expertise: Colonial

Dr Rachael Gilmour
My overarching field of study is colonial and postcolonial literature, theory and linguistic thought. My current research brings my concerns as a cultural historian and literary scholar to bear on contemporary Britain. With Bill Schwarz, I recently co-edited End of Empire and the English Novel since 1945 (2011), which explores the afterlives of empire in English literature and culture. At the moment, I am working on a book project titled Bad English, which broadly develops my current thinking on language and literature, the legacies of empire, and their connections to national and transnational formations. The project explores the relationship between shifting language politics in Britain since the second world war, and the literary multilingualism of writers based in Britain whose formal experimentation, translational writing, and transnational, multilingual poetics help to craft new visions of language and belonging.

Dr Kim Wagner
I work on British imperialism, conflict and culture, and have published extensively on banditry and rebellion in colonial India, especially on the subject of 'Thuggee' and the 'Mutiny' or Indian Uprising of 1857. I am particularly interested in British fears of indigenous conspiracies during the 19th and 20th centuries, and my research focuses on colonial policing and intelligence gathering as well as the correlation between knowledge, panic and anxieties within the context of imperialism.

Prof Robbie Shilliam
My research programme consists of three overlapping streams. In the first, I am working to retrieve the archives and traditions of thought of enslaved Africans and their descendants in the Americas in order to re-assess the various European canons of thought that have predominantly framed understandings of enlightenment, modernity and capitalist development. In the second, I am exploring ways to theorise the global relationships between deferentially situated (post)colonised subjects. Finally, I am exploring the extent to which IR theory needs to be decolonised in terms of its accepted canon, broad assumptions, and central concepts.

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