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The following 5 experts are listed against your chosen search criteria of:
Expertise: Science

Prof Peter Mcowan
My research analyses the brain as a computational system. This comprises computer and human vision, neurobiologically inspired hardware/software, and artificial intelligence.

Dr Samuel Halliday
In my recent work I survey Anglophone and other literature of the early twentieth century, focusing on the sounds this literature represents and the other arts (especially music) with which it is engaged. Other interests more broadly include nineteenth-century American literature, modernism and history of the body. In my current and future research, I will focus in detail on the writings of Ralph Ellison. This work will continue to explore issues relating to sound and sound technology, and will also pay more sustained attention than my previous work to the theory and practice of cinema.

Prof David Berman
My main research interests are in M-theory, the nonperturbative version of string theory. The extended objects in M-theory are membranes and five-branes. They are related to strings and D-branes in string theory via dimensional reduction. Over the last few years my research has been devoted to understanding the interactions of these branes. Mainly this is through studying how membranes end on fivebranes. My other interests over the years have been varied and include: Holography and the AdS/CFT coresspondence; noncommutative geometry; and S-duality in gauge theories. Recently I have been interested in backgrounds to string theory that are intrinsically stringy in origin and not just solutions to supergravity; these go by the name of T-folds.

Dr Brendan Curran
With over 25 years of research experience in studying yeast, a model eukaryotic organism, my current research is focused on the molecular physiology of the yeast Heat Shock Response (HSR). Heat stress induces a subset of genes that encode protective proteins whenever living cells are exposed to a sub-lethal temperature shock. In 1994 we demonstrated that lipids play a vital role in how cells detect stress thereby successfully challenging the accepted paradigm that heat directly induced proteins to unfold - the latter then triggering the response. We have published a series of papers since then which demonstrate that lipids are also key players in conferring cross-tolerance between different types of stressing agents. More recently my group has concentrated on the role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the HSR and we have published a number of papers implicating ROS as central to the cellular HS response mechanism. We have recently shown that lipids protect anaerobically-grown cells from HS-induced ROS thus relating lipids, ROS and the HSR.

Prof Frances Balkwill
I am interested in cancer development and spread, as well as ovarian cancer. I also conduct research on HIV/Aids and specialise in science communication and engagement with children.

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